Tornado Safety Tips
Alicia Duffy, CNE, ASP, ABR                   
RealtorĀ®
214-682-5009
Top
Spring is the peak time for tornadoes in your area.  
HomeAdvisor's Home Sense
Tornado Safety Tips
 
Cost Guide: Handymen
BEFORE
10 Essential Tornado Preparedness Supplies
Get Prepared  
Click link or scroll down
 
To Survive
DURING
Dos and Don’ts
During a Tornado
Stay Safe  
 
Cost Guide: Handymen
AFTER
5 Safety Precautions That Could Save Your Life
Clean Up  
 
 


10 Essential Tornado Preparedness Supplies

Tornadoes can leave significant devastation – sometimes requiring you to survive without power, water and access to groceries and supplies for several days. Don’t be caught unprepared. Keep the following in your home in case of emergency:
WATER
Keep a supply of at least three gallons per person for a three-day period for drinking, sanitation and cooking.
FOOD
Have a supply of non-perishable food to feed your family – including pets – for at least three days. Keep a manual can opener handy too.
FLASHLIGHT
A flashlight is essential in case of power outage. Be sure to store extra batteries. Never light a candle during or after a tornado.
PHONE CHARGER
Keep a cell phone charger that will power your phone without electricity (e.g., powered by battery, solar or car).
Test Your Tornado IQ
RADIO
A battery-powered radio will allow you to receive information in an emergency or electrical outage.
MEDICAL SUPPLIES
Store a first-aid kit, medical supplies and any prescription and non-prescription medication you may require. 
SANITATION SUPPLIES
Keep a supply of hand sanitizer, paper products and bags for use in case clean water becomes unavailable. 
WRENCH OR PLIERS
Have the necessary tools handy in case you need to turn off your power or water supplies as a result of damage. 
WHISTLE
Keep a whistle for each member of your family to wear in case there is a need to signal for help.
PROTECTIVE CLOTHING
Ensure that you have sturdy shoes and protective clothing – including gloves and dust masks – to shield against debris. 
Source: 
FEMA




Tornado Dos and Don’ts

Tornadoes can strike anywhere at any time, requiring immediate action to keep yourself and your loved ones safe. Knowing what to do – and what not to do – when a tornado warning is issued can mean the difference between life and death. Here’s what you need to know:
DO:
Have a tornado plan and preparedness kit.
Collect your wallet, keys, required medications and any other necessities and keep them with you.
Go immediately to an underground shelter or basement – or a small, windowless interior.
Take further shelter under something sturdy, like a heavy table or mattress. Protect your head and crouch down as low to the floor as possible.
Listen to a battery-powered radio for tornado updates.
Stay away from power lines, broken glass, nails and other dangerous objects after the tornado.

Wait for information and instructions from emergency crews or local officials. 

DON'T:

Wait until the tornado is visible before heading to shelter.

Stay in an unstable building.
Park under an overpass (they can be more dangerous than open ground).
Go to the southwest corner of your shelter (this is the direction from which most tornadoes approach).
Stand or sit next to a window or something heavy that may fall on you.
Open windows in your home (you’ll be further exposed to flying glass and debris).

Light a candle (ruptured gas lines can create a fire hazard).

NO ACCESS TO STURDY SHELTER?

If you can’t quickly walk to an established building, immediately get into a vehicle, buckle your seat belt and try to drive to the shelter.

If debris begins to fly while you are driving, pull over and park. 
You have 2 options:

1
If you can safely get significantly lower than the level of the roadway, exit your car and lie in that area, covering your head with your hands.
2
Stay in the car with the seat belt on. Put your head down below the windows, covering with your hands and a blanket if possible.
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Sources:
Associated Press via Fox News




These 5 Post-Tornado Safety Precautions Could Save Your Life

1
WAIT TO ENTER DAMAGED BUILDINGS
Stay out of all damaged structures until local emergency officials have expressed that it’s safe to enter.
2
WEAR PROPER SHOES AND CLOTHING

Wear long sleeves and pants – as well as gloves and work boots or sturdy shoes – to avoid injuries from stray nails and other hazardous debris. Wear protective clothing if available.

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3

SHUT OFF GAS AND ELECTRICAL POWER

If you suspect that there is damage to your home, shut off electrical power, natural gas and propane tanks to prevent fire, electrocution and explosions. Use battery-powered flashlights to see in the dark. Don’t use candles.

4

CLEAN UP HOUSEHOLD SPILLS

Immediately clean up any household spills that may pose a hazard – including medicines, bleaches, gasoline and other flammable liquids. Inform local authorities and call a trained professional to clean up chemicals and other potentially dangerous spills.

5

STAY AWAY FROM 
POWER LINES

Stay away from downed power lines, and report them to the police and your utility company as soon as possible.


Contact Info
E-mail     www.TeamDuffy.com

WILLIAM DAVIS REALTY     17732 Preston Rd #100, Dallas, TX 75252